Last edited by Brajin
Thursday, August 6, 2020 | History

2 edition of U.S. interests in the Middle East found in the catalog.

U.S. interests in the Middle East

Edmund S. Muskie

U.S. interests in the Middle East

by Edmund S. Muskie

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  • 29 Currently reading

Published by U.S. Dept. of State, Bureau of Public Affairs, Office of Public Communication, Editorial Division in Washington, D.C .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • United States -- Foreign relations -- Middle East.,
  • Middle East -- Foreign relations -- United States.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Secretary Muskie and Ambassador Sol M. Linowitz ; [editor, Colleen Sussman].
    SeriesCurrent policy -- no. 242.
    ContributionsLinowitz, Sol M., 1913-, Sussman, Colleen., United States. Dept. of State. Office of Public Communication. Editorial Division.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination6 p. ;
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL18018404M

    Exactly how far Russia’s resurgence in the Middle East will ultimately go remains to be seen, as do the potential strategic ramifications for U.S. interests. But no one should be sanguine. The Despite the physical distance between the United States and the Middle East, U.S. influence has been felt in every country within the region. Throughout the 20th century, strategic interests

    How to stabilize the security relationship between Washington and Beijing. The U.S.-China relationship has not always been smooth, but since Richard Nixon’s opening in the early s, the two   Anne-Marie is the executive editor of The Polar Journal, and has written nine books and over forty scholarly articles on topics ranging from China’s modern propaganda system, foreigner-management in China and competing foreign policy interests in Antarctica. Her latest monograph, China as a Polar Great Power, examines China’s polar ://

      establishment of the U.S. Department of Education. Which book challenged conformity by suggesting it would make workers incapable of independent thought? The Man in the Gray Flannel Suit. The Catcher in the Rye. The Organization Man. The Invisible Man. What was one result of U.S. covert actions in Latin America and the Middle East??qid=AAoESeO.   The Foundations of Geopolitics: The Geopolitical Future of Russia is a geopolitical book by Aleksandr book has had a large influence within the Russian military, police, and foreign policy elites and it has been used as a textbook in the Academy of the General Staff of the Russian military. Its publication in was well-received in Russia and powerful Russian political figures


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U.S. interests in the Middle East by Edmund S. Muskie Download PDF EPUB FB2

2 days ago  My work on these issues will result in a book on changing U.S. interests in the Middle East and suggest that the United States needs to define its interests with greater precision, while finding a Additional Physical Format: Online version: Muskie, Edmund S., U.S.

interests in the Middle East. Washington, D.C.: U.S. Dept. of State, Bureau of Public In the last half of the twentieth century, cultural products--from films and news reports to museum exhibits and novels--profoundly shaped ideas about the relationship between Americans and the Middle East. In this innovative book, Melani McAlister explores the cultural history of political interests, arguing that U.S.

encounters with the   the Middle East’s energy supplies and several communist -leaning regimes rendered it part of the US-Soviet chessboard. In the s the United States expanded its security presence in the region to contain Saddam Hussein’s Iraq and the clerical regime in Iran.

At the same time, & Moller - The United States. Epic Encounters examines how popular culture has shaped the ways Americans define their "interests" in the Middle this innovative book―now brought up-to-date to include 9/11 and the Iraq war―Melani McAlister argues that U.S.

foreign policy, while grounded in material and military realities, is also developed in a cultural  › Books › New, Used & Rental Textbooks › Humanities.

The U.S. has highlighted the threat of terrorism from the Middle East, billing it as America’s major national security concern in the post-cold war world. Washington considers Iran, Iraq, Sudan, and Libya to be the primary sources of state-sponsored terrorism and has embarked on an ambitious policy to isolate these regimes in the   One of the most persistent myths about U.S.

foreign policy is the idea that America desires—due to greed, messianic ideological impulses, or simple imperial presumptions—to dominate the Middle East. In reality, American policy has long been torn by two conflicting imperatives: The need to protect enduring U.S.

interests, on the one hand, and the desire to stay clear of the The Middle East has been a central focus of the United States’ foreign policy.

The purpose of the current research is to shed light on the United States’ economic and political presence in the Middle East region before and after World War I and after World War II to understand how United States’ presence has developed in the region and what motives were behind its ://?PaperID= Russia, the United States, and the Middle East.

J We don’t know much about what was said when U.S. President Donald Trump sat across from Russian President Vladimir Putin on the sidelines of the G20 summit on July 7, but we do know they talked a lot about the Middle :// President Lyndon Johnson focused much of his energies on his Great Society programs at home and the Vietnam War abroad.

The Middle East burst back onto the American foreign policy radar with the Six-Day War ofwhen Israel, after rising tension and threats from all sides, pre-empted what it characterized as an impending attack from Egypt, Syria, and ://   Epic Encounters examines how popular culture has shaped the ways Americans define their interests in the Middle East.

In this innovative book--now brought up-to-date to include 9/11 and the Iraq war--Melani McAlister argues that U.S. foreign policy, while grounded in material and military realities, is also developed in a cultural :// What Vladimir Putin Really Wants in the Middle East A new book translates Russia’s fears and hopes for Syria, and the wider region, for an American audience.

By Masha Kirasirova   U.S. Strategic Interests in the Middle East and Implications for the Army Karl P.

Mueller, Becca Wasser, Jeffrey Martini, Stephen Watts M any U.S. administrations have attempted to limit American involvement in the Middle East.

The immense costs of previous interventions cast a heavy shadow over how policymakers view the risk Phase Two of America’s war in the Middle East began in when the elder Bush ordered U.S.

troops to intervene in Somalia and ended a decade later inwhen Bush’s son prematurely   Any U.S. plan has to start with basics—the importance of the region to the security and well-being of Eurasia, a core U.S.

goal since The Middle East is an essential unifying component of Eurasia, the source of many of the world's conflicts sinceand a key element in the U.S /view/u.s.-policy-and-strategy-in-the-middle-east.

In an era in which U.S. interests are being examined more critically, the greater Middle East continues to present high stakes for Ameri-can policymakers. Taking a longer-term (through ) perspective, U.S.

key national interests include • the survival of Israel and completion of the Middle East peace process, • access to oil,   The Middle East Policy Council is a nonprofit organization whose mission is to contribute to American understanding of the political, economic and cultural issues that affect U.S.

interests in the Middle East. Read More Balancing U.S. interests in the Middle East Balancing United States interests in the Middle East Series Choices for the 21st century Note Cover title.

"May "--T.p. verso. ISBN By fiscal yearthe level of annual U.S. democracy aid in the Middle East was more than the total amount spent from to But while it was categorized as democracy aid, it wasn’t U.S.

Central Command confirmed Tuesday that bombers headed to the Middle East will be Bs as it sought to clarify plans to deploy a carrier strike group and a bomber task force to the region /us-sending-bs-to-middle-east-as-part-of-iran-response.

Get this from a library! Shifting sands: balancing U.S. interests in the Middle East. [Thomas J. Watson, Jr. Institute for International Studies (Brown University); Choices for the 21st Century Education Program.;] -- Shifting Sands: Balancing U S Interest In The Middle East draws students into the policy debate on one of the world's most volatile ://President al-Sisi's regional foreign policy decisions have taken a different approach compared to past Egyptian presidencies.

Understanding where Egypt is headed and the backbone of al-Sisi's foreign policies is important not only for U.S. interests in the Middle East and North Africa, but for regional security and ://  The Middle East accounts for around 5 percent of global GDP.

It is growing by about 5 percent annually and accounts for about 5 percent of U.S. exports. Arab cash purchases and generous taxpayer funding of arms transfers to Israel play a vital role in keeping production lines open and sustaining the U.S.

defense industrial ://